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Archives for : speaking

Next Door

So, we’ve had to keep this under our hats for a little while, but yesterday Apple posted their Beyond WWDC page, revealing the co-located conferences Layers, AltConf, and CocoaConf Next Door. The first two of these have taken place the same week as WWDC for a few years now, but CocoaConf making an appearance that week is new.

As a CocoaConf regular, they asked me to participate in CocoaConf Next Door, and so I’ll be doing three sessions (and likely some other events). We’re still working out what those will be, as it’s a little tricky to strategize a conference talk the week of WWDC and minimize the chance of it being rendered obsolete by changes to iOS and macOS revealed at WWDC. I mean, it’s not like you’d want to build a talk around view controller rotation-handling for that week, since the “right way” to do that seems to change every couple years. But you also don’t want to do something that’s so evergreen that it’s boring either.

Chris Adamson - Stupid Video Tricks

I will probably reprise my talk about media frameworks and Swift from Forward Swift and CocoaConf Chicago, because it’s the best one I’ve done in years, and it does get into some pretty interesting areas about the Swift language itself and where it struggles to live up to its ambitions (I blogged about some of this in Render Unto C-sar). I’ll be putting more work into the talk — maybe by June, I can actually get my custom AUAudioUnit working (I’m pretty stuck at the moment, and a DTS support incident did not unblock me).

It’s possible that for the last day of the conference, I’ll have a new talk based on things that get revealed on Monday. That would be a great way to keep things fresh, though I want to avoid Janie Clayton’s “First to pee on Mount Everest” syndrome, i.e., being the first to try out some new feature or API, but not enlighten or bring away anything from it except to basically yell “first post!” So, still thinking about how to make sure that’ll still be valuable to attendees.

CocoaConf’s blog has details about how they’ll schedule their time around the WWDC keynotes so we don’t miss out on the good stuff (or, god forbid, another 30-minute Apple Music presentation). Early Bird registration is open. It’s $999, which seems pretty reasonable for a four-day conference (CocoaConf is usually like $600 for two days, and across the street, Layers’ early bird price is $850 for three days, to say nothing of WWDC costing $1600). Maybe we’re going to be somebody’s Plan B if they don’t win the WWDC ticket lottery but still want to be in town that week; we’ll make it a pretty damn worthwhile Plan B. Plus, CocoaConf registration includes tickets to the James Dempsey and the Breakpoints concert on Wednesday night.

The other thing that’s exciting about this week is the degree to which it represents a real, ongoing change in Apple’s openness and its attitude towards the larger iOS/macOS/tvOS/watchOS developer ecosystem. As Daniel Jalkut reminded us yesterday:

So, I’m looking forward to doing some new talks at CocoaConf Next Door, meeting up with friends in the evening, and certainly hoping that App Camp for Girls’ Jean McDonald finds a suitable karaoke place for her “Core Audio” group of developer-singers (if they have it, I’m calling dibs on “History Maker”).

Render Unto C-sar

A few weeks back, I did a presentation at Forward Swift, the idea of which to explore how the media frameworks reveal some really interesting pain points in using Swift, and what this tells us about the language.

Slides are already up on Slideshare, and can be viewed here:



I’ll be doing this talk again at CocoaConf Chicago and an NDA event that will probably be announced next week. Forward Swift usually posts its videos eventually, and I’ll blog here once mine is available.

But I want to dig into one of the key points of the talk, because it came up again earlier this week…

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Spring 2017 Conferences

Quick note, before Early Bird pricing ends. I’m speaking at two conferences this Spring.

I’ll be at Forward Swift in San Francisco on March 2. There, I’m doing a talk called “Audio Frameworks and Swift: This Is Fine”. The idea of the talk is to look at how well Swift does and doesn’t work as a language for calling the iOS and Mac audio frameworks. This covers things like how to call the C-based frameworks (Audio Toolbox and the other higher-level parts of Core Audio) from Swift, and where you get into some real mismatches between the languages, and what to do about it. I covered this phenomenon on the blog a while back in Radio on the TV.

My plan is to write an audio reverser app to demo this, as I don’t think there’s a good way to do that in AV Foundation, meaning you’d want to use either Audio Converter Services or Extended Audio Files from Audio Toolbox. Plus, playing music backwards should make for a fun demo.

I’ll also be covering v3 Audio Units, which specifically prohibits you from using Swift in the “kernel” of your AU, since that’s called on a realtime thread and there are all sorts of ways that Swift is not quite yet ready for that kind of use, even though it’s billed as being a systems programming language. I’ll try to make this talk more about the language — what it can and can’t/shouldn’t do, what it’s good and bad at — than the frameworks, to try to make it more approachable. I don’t want this to be a draw only for the people who’ve read the Core Audio book and happen to be in SF that week (if I wanted that, we could just get a table at Super Duper and chat over burgers and beer).

Forward Swift early bird registration ends tomorrow, so hop on it if you’re so inclined.

I’ll be doing this talk again at CocoaConf Chicago on April 21-22, along with the Firebase talk I did at CocoaConfs DC and San Jose last Fall.

CocoaConf’s early bird ends on February 25.

Hope to see you at one or both of these.

CocoaConf Fall tour, 2016

CocoaConf San Jose early bird registration ends tomorrow, so that’s my last chance to plug the talks I’m doing there.

(yeah, I know I said I was taking a pause from conferences, and I shouldn’t be pushing myself during what’s been the worst 12 months of my life, but what can I say, I like doing CocoaConf)

I developed two new talks for CocoaConf DC, and those are the same ones I’ll be doing in San Jose.

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CocoaConf San Jose starts on Thursday. As with the other stops on the Fall tour, I’ll be doing an all-day class on App Extensions, and regular sessions on WatchKit media APIs and “Revenge of the 80s”, which is about old productivity APIs like cut/copy/paste that have been with us since the first Macs and which we take for granted.

This is also the last speaking I’ll be doing for a while. I’m taking at least the first half of 2016 off, maybe longer.

OK, sorry, didn’t mean to sound dramatic. But hey, you have to have a hook before the fold. Let me explain where my head’s at right now.

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Late 2015 Conferences Update

Quick note about speaking plans for late 2015:


CocoaConf

I’ll be speaking at CocoaConfs Boston (Sep. 18-9) and San Jose (Nov. 6-7). Boston is going to be a one-track conference, since CocoaConf had such good results with that in Yosemite. I’ll be bringing my App Extensions class and Video Killed the Rolex Star, which is all about the media APIs that are (and aren’t) on Apple Watch.

Chris Adamson in Game Show

Early Bird for Boston ends Friday (July 31), so get on it if you want to go.

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Game of Clowns

CocoaConf Columbus was last week, and as has been the tradition for the last year or so, I participated in The CocoaConf Game Show, a take off on the BBC Radio panel show Just a Minute, in which panelists have to speak extemporaneously on an arbitrary topic, without pauses, going off-topic, or even repeating words not in the topic itself.

I’m not nearly quick-witted enough for this, certainly not as much so as regular panelists James Dempsey or Josh Smith, but I try to hang in there. Or maybe I’m just always tired at the end of the conference (this time from staying up late the night before with Janie Clayton-Hasz and Laura Hart watching Adolescence of Utena, because anime).

Anyways, point here is that I have to come up with something funny (and not pause or repeat any words) on an arbitrary topic. Turns out it’s better to just do something silly with it, but when you get a topic that really matters to you, that’s another story…

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Best CocoaConf Fall Tour Ever

In previous years, planning for Q3 speaking dates has been an enormous hassle, thanks to the Apple NDA: you can’t talk about any of the stuff coming in the new version of iOS, so you have to deliberately pick older topics, with a possible eye to getting new stuff ready to go depending on when Apple announces and releases the new bits, and whether that lines up with your conference dates.

Last year, I just threw up my hands and did evergreen topics that were largely outside the Apple sphere of influence: A/V encoding and Audiobus.

[iframe src=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/cocoaconf/12999333684/player/” width=”500″ height=”333″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen]

This year, thanks to Apple backing off the NDA, speakers are free to dig into the new stuff introduced at WWDC. This suddenly transforms August’s CocoaConf Columbus from having old, crusty, but NDA-safe material, to instead being one of the first conferences that can dig into the iOS 8 technologies.

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Dub Dub Disclosure Conference

Interesting development coming out of WWDC this year. When we all logged into the dev center to get the new iOS 8 / Mac OS X 10.10 / Xcode 6 bits, there was a new developer agreement to acknowledge. One of the few people to actually read it, Ole Begemann, noticed that it has a surprising new provision:

Further, Apple agrees that You will not be bound by the foregoing confidentiality terms with regard to technical information about pre-release Apple Software and services disclosed by Apple at WWDC (Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference), except that You may not post screen shots, write public reviews or redistribute any pre-release Apple Software or services

In the past, all of us developers have had to tip-toe around the new SDKs, APIs, and tools until they’re officially released, which leads to embarrassing situations like WWDC recap sessions at CocoaHeads where we say “well, if they were going to put an Obj-C wrapper around Core Audio, they might…”. This new change in policy would seem to indicate that we’re no longer compelled to engage in such silly antics.

Fry: Not sure if NDA is still on, or if I just broke it

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AVMutableCocoaConfPresentationInstruction

I’m speaking at three of the five CocoaConfs for early 2014, teaching an all-day AV Foundation Film School class and a regular session on Stupid Video Tricks, which is also all about AV Foundation. (In DC, I also reprised Get on the Audiobus to fill in for another speaker).

UPDATE: I’m also going to do “Stupid Video Tricks” at next week’s Ann Arbor CocoaHeads.

I first taught the class in Chicago, and then added one more project for DC and San Jose based on how the timing worked out. To speed things up, I created starter projects that dealt with all the storyboard connections and drudge-work, leaving big holes in the code that say // TODO: WRITE IN CLASS for the stuff we do as a code-along. The class projects are:

  1. Play back a video file from a URL
  2. Capture into a video file (and play back in another tab, with the code from 1)
  3. Edit together clips and export as a new .m4v file, first as a cuts-only edit (easy), and then with cross-dissolved (quite painful and clearly marked as an hour of outright drudgery)
  4. Processing video frames at capture-time with Core Image

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