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Xcode Treasures: Source Code Management

Another update to the Xcode Treasures beta has been released today. This one is all about Source Code Management.

Scm toc

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Xcode Treasures: Security

The first update to the Xcode Treasures beta release went out yesterday, and it’s a doozy: Security. Actually, in my original proposal and outline for the book, this was called Code-Signing Hell. Obviously, I knew I had to cover it, but was not looking forward to the experience.

Xcode treasures security toc

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Xcode Treasures Now Available

Announcement from Pragmatic Progammers today: Xcode Treasures: Master the Tools to Design, Build, and Distribute Great Apps is now in beta.

So, this is the book that I’ve been cagily dropping hints about on Twitter for months, and that I showed off at CocoaHeads Ann Arbor two weeks back. I’ve also started creating videos for it as part of invalidstream, where you can already check out demos from the Debugging chapter (parts 1, 2, and 3).

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Video Killed the Prose Star

I’m always surprised by the popularity of video lessons. Personally, I prefer the density of books, but there’s clearly an audience out there that wants to see things done step-by-step on screen, while watching and listening to the presenter. Every time I get a royalty statement on the Core Audio book, there’s a little bit of activity from two videos I did for them while working on the book (one a studio-produced “live lesson”, the other a conference presentation from like 2012 or something).

Sort of as an experiment — and also because I needed ready-to-go content for my weekly livestream — I decided to go through the entire iOS 10 SDK Development book that I co-wrote with Janie, in 30 minute chunks at the beginning of each week’s stream, prior to getting into the fun stuff like the iPad let’s plays and the visual novels. The Xcode segment was fairly easy to prep each week, it got me back in touch with the contents of the book and what I do and don’t like about it, and being all in XCode, it was a different way of presenting the material than several paragraphs of thinky-think followed by a code listing.

Final Cut Pro screenshot while editing Xcode segment of invalidstream

Oh, and as a bonus, it allowed me to create a complete intro-to-iOS-development video course.

The Prags have been publishing links to each video as I get them up on Vimeo, on the book’s home page, and last week, I finished the book. So if you’re so inclined, you can start watching all 24 videos, even without a copy of the book. Heck, you can even download the code from the book’s home page.

And yeah, I know, it’s “iOS 10 SDK Development”. Actually, I was pleasantly surprised that nothing broke during our year away from the book. If I had to update it now, I’d want to cover the Safe Area in Auto Layout instead of just talking about margins, and of course I’d get in some iPhone X screenshots, but that’s about it. (There are other topics I’d want to cover, but what’s there now isn’t incorrect or anything.) We’re pretty lucky that we moved the book’s sample code away from Twitter and turned it into a podcast app instead, because all the Social framework stuff that we depended on for the iOS 6 through 9 books is gone in iOS 11. We totally dodged a bullet there.

SLServiceType constants deprecated in iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra

So anyways, help yourself to the videos, either on the Prags page or invalidstream.com. I’m taking a couple weeks’ hiatus from the stream to speed up work on my next (unannounced) book, and to build up the content pipeline for another few Friday nights of Xcode work, non-F2P iPad games, and Muv-Luv Alternative (we’re almost to where it gets good!).

iOS 10 SDK Development now available

OK, third year on this annual book-update plan, here we go: iOS 10 SDK Development now available in beta.

Cover of iOS 10 SDK Development

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Now In Glorious Extra COLOR

Parody title card: Now In Glorious Extra COLOR

iOS 9 SDK Development is now shipping, and I got my copies today. After some longer-than-expected delays copy-editing and indexing, the Prags surprised us with a very cool feature:

The book is printed in COLOR. Not just 16 pages of color plates in the middle. Like, the whole damn thing is in color. Every code listing is syntax-highlighted, every sidebar is in Prags Purple, and every simulator screenshot with a photo looks like an actual iPhone or iPad screen.

This got mentioned as a possibility during layout review, and I was surprised by it, but I guess with the lower-volume print-on-demand publishing technology they now use, color is more practical than in the old days of offset printing when you needed to work in batches of 5,000.

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Entropy

Confession: I have no idea whether the code examples from Learning Core Audio work on El Capitan and iOS 9. Maybe? Probably most of them? But I’m in a really conflicted state with where that book is.

The book came out in early 2012, which now makes it about four years old. It took about two years off and on to write, 2010 and 2011, with a big push to wrap it up at the end of 2011 because our editor was leaving Pearson to go to Apple. Looking at my mail history, I was approached about replacing Mike Lee on the book in late 2009, so the small amount of material that he and Kevin Avila wrote probably dates back to earlier in that year.

The point of this all being, the book is old now. The stated system requirements are Xcode 4.2, Lion (Mac OS X 10.7), and iOS 5. The examples in the first few chapters that use Foundation instead of Core Foundation actually use manual retain, release and the NSAutoreleasePool because the book largely pre-dates ARC (we did finally ARC-ify those examples in the April 2014 update to the downloadable sample code, at the cost of no longer matching the written material in the book).

So now what?

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iOS 9 SDK Development now available

New book alert: iOS 9 SDK Development, now available as a beta ebook from Pragmatic Programmers.

Cover of iOS 9 SDK Development

So what’s new and different? Well, the big one is, it hasn’t been three years since the previous edition. In the history of the basic iOS book from Pragmatic Programmers, between me, Bill, and Janie, it’s previously been the case that we’d more or less completely rewrite the whole thing, then not do anything with the title for two or three years. And at that point, we’d find it was so out of date, we either had to do a ground-up rewrite, or pull it out of print. Not to mention that the sales in years 2 and 3 were pretty much zero; nobody wants an iOS 6 book once iOS 7 comes out.

So, new idea: instead of rewriting 100% of the book every three years, how about we rewrite 33% of the book every year? Could that be a sustainable pace? That’s what we set out to try with this edition.

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Paper Ball and Chain

We’re so close to finally having iOS 8 SDK Development out the door! We just got the index back on Friday, and it looks great. I spent some time last night going over it, looking for either missing topics or things that didn’t really need to be in there, and it all looked great. If anything, I came away thinking “did we really write all that?”

Clipping from iOS 8 SDK Development index

And yet I’m kind of wondering: do books even need indexes anymore?

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Announcing iOS 8 SDK Development

Not that I’ve been even remotely subtle about it, but with today’s release of iOS 8 and the end of the NDA on its SDK, I can now officially announce iOS 8 SDK Development, now available as a beta book from Pragmatic Programmers:

Here’s the tl;dr:

  • Pretty much completely rewritten from previous edition
  • All code examples use the Swift programming language
  • Works through a single app all the way through the book so readers get experience of evolving a non-trivial app
  • Shows off iOS 8 features, including adaptive sizing strategies for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus

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