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Archives for : January2012

The Whiny Little Bitch Contingent meets iBooks Author

Let me introduce you to the “Whiny Little Bitch Contingent”. This was a term I coined in the late 2000’s to cover the Java developers who cried and moaned about the slow decline in Apple’s support for Java: the deprecation of the Cocoa-Java bridge, the long wait for Java 6 on Mac OS X, its absence from iOS, etc. Every time there was news on this front, they could be reliably counted on to dredge up Steve Jobs’ pledge at the JavaOne 2000 keynote to make the Mac the best Java programming environment… and to bring this up in seeming ignorance of the passage of many years, the changes in the tech world, the abject failure of Desktop Java, other companies’ broken promises (Sony’s pledge of Java on the PlayStation 2, the Java-based Phantom gaming console), etc.

The obvious trait of the Whiny Little Bitch Contingent is their sense of entitlement: companies like Apple owe us stuff. The more subtle trait is their ignorance of the basic principle that people, organizations, and companies largely operate in their own self-interest. Apple got interested in Java when it seemed like a promising way to write Mac apps (or, a promising way to get developers to write Mac apps). When that failed, they had understandably little interest in providing developers a means of writing apps for other platforms. I’m sure I’m not the only person to write a Java webapp on the Mac that I knew my employer would block Mac clients from actually using. By 2008, when Apple entered the mobile market with the iPhone, there was nothing about supporting Java that would appeal to Apple’s self-interest, outside of a small number of hardware sales to Java developers.

That’s what defines the WLBC to me: sense of entitlement, and an igorance of other parties’ self-interest (which leads to an expectation of charity and thus the sense of entitlement).

So, yesterday, Apple holds an event to roll out their whole big deal with Textbooks on the iPad. They look pretty, they’ve got an economic model that may make some sense for publishers (i.e., it may be in the publishers’ self-interest), etc. Also, there’s a tool for creating textbooks in Apple’s format.

And this is where the Whiny Little Bitch Contingent goes ape-shit. Because there’s a clause in the iBooks Author EULA that says if you’re going to charge for your books, you can only publish to Apple’s iBookstore.

So, let’s back up a second. The only point of this software is to feed Apple’s content chain. The only reason it is being offered, free, is to lure authors and publishers to use Apple’s stuff… which in turn sells more iPads and gives Apple a 30% cut. If you are not going to put stuff on Apple’s store, why do you even care about this? Hell, I don’t develop for Microsoft’s platforms, so if they see the need to turn Visual Studio into an adventure game… hey that’s their problem.

If you’re not authoring for Apple’s iBookstore, why do you even care what iBooks Author does, or what’s in its EULA?

In decrying the “cold cynicism” of Apple’s iBook EULA, Marshall Kirkpatrick writes:

It’s hard to wrap my brain around the cold cynicism of Apple’s releasing a new tool to democratize the publishing of eBooks today, only to include in the tool’s terms and conditions a prohibition against selling those books anywhere but through Apple’s own bookstore

“Democratize the publishing of eBooks”? Where the hell did he get that? Maybe he watched the video and fell for the grandiosity and puffery… I never actually watch these Apple dog-and-pony shows anymore, as following the Twitter discussion seems to give me the info I need. But thinking that Apple is in the business of democratizing anything is nuts: they’re in the business of selling stuff, and the only reason they’d give out a free tool is to get you to help them sell more of that stuff.

I didn’t download iBooks Author, even though you’d expect an Apple-skewing author like me to be one of the first onboard. Frankly, I’m pretty tired of writing, as the last two books have been difficult experiences, and the thought of starting another book, even with a 70% royalty instead of 5%, is not that appealing. A year ago I thought about self-publishing a book on AV Foundation, but right now I lack the will (also, I’ve failed to fall in love with AV Foundation, and blanch at its presumptions, limitations, and lack of extensibility… I much prefer the wild and wooly QuickTime or Core Audio).

So, if we’re going to talk about iBooks Author, let me know how it holds up for long documents: if it’s pretty on page 1, is it still usable when you’re 200 pages in? Does it offer useful tools for managing huge numbers of assets? Does it provide its own revision system and change tracking, or does it at least play nicely with Subversion and Git? Can it be used in a collaborative environment? These are interesting questions, at least to people who plan to use the tool to publish books on the iBookstore.

But if Apple’s not giving you a pretty, free tool you can use to write .mobi files that Amazon can sell Kindles with? Sorry, Whiny Little Bitch Contingent, I’ve got zero sympathy for you there. Call it a third party opportunity. Or just put on your big boy underwear and do it yourself.

Take it, Geddy:

You don’t get something for nothing
You can’t have freedom for free
You won’t get wise
With the sleep still in your eyes
No matter what your dreams might be

My SOPA/PIPA e-mail to Rep. Justin Amash and Sens. Debbie Stabenow and Carl Levin

I make my living developing copyrighted content. I pay my Federal and Michigan taxes with the income I derive writing iPhone and iPad apps, and books about programming.

It is absurdly easy to pirate my work. Google for “adamson ios sdk torrent” and you’ll find the latest book I’m co-authoring available by BitTorrent, despite the fact that my co-author and I haven’t even finished the book yet. Jailbreaking of the iPhone also makes it easy to steal the apps I write.

Nevertheless, I am appalled by the proposed “Stop Online Piracy Act” (SOPA), and the manner in which it has been brought before Congress. The December hearings in the House featured effectively no competent techincal testimony from Internet engineers, and looked to me like it was meant for show at best.

The legislation is rife with over-broad language and unintended consequences, and has little prospect of effectively stopping piracy, while causing massive collateral damage to all manner of legitimate and productive business and art.

Its supporters in Hollywood claim they’re protecting jobs, but what they’re protecting, at best, are their own outdated business models of deliberate scarcity. If you want to reform IP law to protect jobs, how about cleaning up the granting of software patents for trivial ideas, something that presents an imminent mortal threat to my industry?

This is terrible, terrible legislation, and it is shameful that the Congress has allowed it to get as far as it has. If it passes, you will be held accountable.

Your constituent,
Chris Adamson

CodeMash 2012 sessions

Stuff from my CodeMash 2.0.1.2 sessions:

Achievement Unlocked: Finish “Learning Core Audio”

There’s nothing like losing your editor — to Apple, no less — to ratchet up the heat to finish a book that has been too long on the burner. But with Chuck doing exactly that at the end of December, Kevin and I had the motivation to push aside our clients and other commitments long enough to finally finish the Learning Core Audio book (yes, the title is new), and send it off to the production process.

In our final push, we went through the tech review comments and reported errata — Lion broke a lot of our example code — and ended up rewriting every example in the book as Xcode 4 projects, moving the base SDK to Snow Leopard, which allowed us to ditch all the old Component Manager dependencies. For the iOS chapter, we rev’ed up to iOS 4 as a baseline and tested against iOS 5.

One of the advantages of Xcode 4 is that the source directory is cleaner for source control (no more ever-changing build folder that you have to avoid committing), while also offering a pretty simple way to get to the “derived data” folder with the build result, which was important for us because we have a number of command-line examples that create audio files relative to the executable, and Xcode 4 makes them easy to find.

In our final push, we also managed to get in an exercise with the AUSampler, the MIDI instrument that pitch-shifts the audio file of your choice, into the wrap-up chapter. So that should keep things nice and fresh. Thanks to Apple for finally providing public guidance on how to get the .aupreset file to load into the audio unit, and how the unit deals with absolute paths to the sample audio in the app bundle case.

Updated code is available from my Dropbox: learning-core-audio-xcode4-projects-jan-03-2012.zip

From here, Pearson will take a few months to layout the book, run it by us for proofing and fixes, and send it off to the printer. So… paper copies probably sometime in Spring. The whole book — minus this last round of corrections — is already on Safari Books Online, and will be updated as it goes through Pearson’s production process.

It seems like there’s been a big uptake in Core Audio in the last year or two. More importantly, we’ve moved from people struggling through the basics of Audio Queues for simple file playback (back in iPhone OS 2.0 when Core Audio was the only game in town for media) and now we see a lot of questions about pushing into interesting uses of mixing, effects, digital signal processing, etc. Enough people have gotten sufficiently unblocked that there’s neat stuff going on in this area, and we’re fortunate to be part of it.