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Video Editing with Haddocks

News.com.com.com.com, on evidence of a new Apple video format in iMovie 8.0.5

Dubbed iFrame, the new video format is based on industry standard technologies like H.264 video and AAC audio. As expected with H.264, iFrame produces much smaller file sizes than traditional video formats, while maintaining its high-quality video. Of course, the smaller file size increases import speed and helps with editing video files.

Saying smaller files are easier to edit is like saying cutting down the mightiest tree in the forest is easier with a haddock than with a chainsaw, as the former is lighter to hold.

The real flaw with this is that H.264, while a lovely end-user distribution format, uses heavy temporal compression, potentially employing both P-frames (“predicted” frames, meaning they require data from multiple earlier frames), and B-frames (“bidirectionally predicted” frames, meaning they require data from both earlier and subsequent frames). Scrubbing frame-by-frame through H.264 is therefore slowed by sometimes having to read in and decompress multiple frames of data in order to render the next one. And in my Final Cut experience, scrubbing backwards through H.264 is particularly slow; shuttle a few frames backwards and you literally have to let go of the wheel for a few seconds to let the computer catch up. For editing, you see a huge difference when you use a format with only I-frames (“intra” frames, meaning every frame has all the data it needs), such as M-JPEG or Pixlet.

You can use H.264 in an all-I-frame mode (which makes it more or less M-JPEG), but then you’re not getting small file-sizes meant for end-user distribution. I’ll bet that iFrame employs H.264 P- and B-frames, being aimed at the non-pro user whose editing consists of just a handful of cuts, and won’t mind the disk grinding as they identify the frame to cut on.

But for more sophisticated editing, having your source in H.264 would be painful.

This also speaks to a larger point of Apple seemingly turning its back on advanced media creatives in favor of everyday users with simpler needs. I’ve been surprised at CocoaHeads meetings to hear that I’m not the only one who bemoans the massive loss of functionality from the old 32-bit C-based QuickTime API to the easier-to-use but severely limited QTKit. That said, everyone else expects that we’ll see non-trivial editing APIs in QTKit eventually. I hope they’re right, but everything I see from Apple, including iFrame’s apparent use of H.264 as a capture-time and therefore edit-time format, makes me think otherwise.

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