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What’s New, Blue Q?

One-time self-described “World’s Greatest Compressionist” Ben Waggoner posts a pointed question to the quicktime-api list:

http://www.apple.com/macosx/what-is-macosx/quicktime.html

What I’d like to know is if QuickTime X is going to be available for Windows and older versions of Mac OS X.

It’s an important issue, because despite iTunes’ insistence on installing QuickTime on Windows, the future of that product seems completely unknown. For years, every question I’ve seen about the future of QuickTime on Windows has been met with absolute silence from Apple. Yeah, I know, “Apple does not comment on unannounced products,” and all… Still, Apple has left this technology in limbo for a remarkably long time. I recall asking ADC reps about QuickTime for Windows back at Leopard Tech Day Atlanta in 2006, as I was considering calling it from Java with JNI, and (as previously noted), I got no reply at all. And every other public question I’ve seen about the future of QuickTime on Windows has gone similarly unanswered, for years.

Smell that? That’s the scent of Abandoned Code Rot. We got that from QuickTime for Java for a few years before they managed to finally deprecate it (though they apparently haven’t gotten the message out).

It wouldn’t be too surprising to see QT for Windows fall by the wayside… Apple probably cares more about the popularity of its favorite formats and codecs (AAC and H.264) than of the QuickTime APIs and QuickTime’s interactive features like Wired Sprites that have been clearly and unequivocally beaten by Flash.

But if that’s true of Windows, is it also true on the Mac? QuickTime developers are right to be a little worried. The old C-based QuickTime API remains a 32-bit only option, intended to be replaced by the Objective-C QTKit. But in the four years since its introduction in Tiger, QTKit has only taken on part of the capabilities of the old QuickTime API. With Leopard, you could finally do capture and some significant editing (e.g., inserting segments at the movie or track levels), but raw sample level data was unavailable for any track type other than video, and some of the more interesting track types (like effects and especially tweens, useful for fading an audio track’s volume between specific times) are effectively useless in QTKit.

With Snow Leopard, the big news isn’t a more capable QTKit API, it’s QuickTime X. And as Apple’s QuickTime X page points out, QTX is all about a highly-optimized playback path (using decode hardware if available) and polished presentation. Great news if you’re playing 1080p movies on your computer or living room PC, not so much if you want to edit them: if you want to edit anything, you’re back in the old 32-bit QuickTime (and the code is probably still written in C against the old APIs, given QTKit’s numerous limitations). You don’t see a 64-bit Final Cut Pro, now do you? (BTW, here’s a nice blog on that topic.)

When you all install Snow Leopard tomorrow and run the QTX-based QuickTime Player, you’ll immediately understand why the $30 QuickTime Pro (which bought you editing and exporting from the Player app and the plug-in) is gone. Follow up in the comments tomorrow (after the NDA drops) and we’ll discuss further.

If I were starting a major new multimedia project that wasn’t solely playback-based — imagine, say, a podcast studio that would combine the editing, exporting, and publishing tasks that you might currently perform with Garage Band, iTunes, and FTP — I would be very confused as to which technology to adopt. QuickTime’s cross-platform story seems to be finished (QTJ deprecated, QTW rotting away), and everything we hear on the Mac side is about playback. Would it be safer to assume that QuickTime doesn’t have a future as a media creation framework, and drop down to the engine level (Core Audio and Core Video)? And if not QuickTime… then what?

Oh, and as for the first question from the quicktime-api thread:

… How about Apple throwing us a bone as to what QuickTime X will offer those of us that use QT and QTSS?

From what I can tell, Apple has all but ditched QTSS in favor of HTTP Live Streaming, supported by QuickTime X and iPhone 3.0.

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